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Giving Tuesday Now

In the wake of COVID-19, non-profits have been severely impacted. Art galleries and museums have closed. Symphonies, theatre and dance troupes have canceled Spring and Summer performances. Gala fundraisers have been canceled, left and right.

Giving Tuesday Now (from the brainchild of the online day of Giving during the Holiday Season) joined forces on May 5, 2020 for individuals to donate to non-profits, including WCRS. WCRS is an all-volunteer operated station run entirely by volunteers, who while social distancing, are running the station away from the Free Press Carriage House. Community Radio costs money. From licensing fees to maintenance on our antennas, it is not cheap to bring you community radio from the grassroots.

For more information on donating to WCRS, go to http://www.wcrsfm.org/donate. Any bit helps.

Our Studios May Be Closed, But We Are Still On The Air


By Bryan Curtiss, Writer

Last week, it was decided that the Free Press Carriage House would be closed until further notice. What does that mean necessarily? Does it mean that your favorite locally produced show will be going on an extended hiatus? Not quite. The decision to go on hiatus is solely on the producers of a respective show.

WCRS-FM is not the only radio station located at the Free Press Carriage House. WGRN 94.1 FM also records shows in the studio as well. Some shows are not produced in the studios at all, but in people’s homes (or studios), while some other shows that have been recorded at the Free Press Carriage House, including The DJBC Happy Hour, have moved to being recorded at home, and a few other shows will be on hiatus.

The Columbus Free Press Newspaper is also produced in the Free Press Carriage House. However, the Free Press did not print an April Issue, and will not be printing one in May either.

During this Coronavirus Pandemic, there has been a lot of good in the community during all of the chaos of people being laid off, companies being forced to close, and everyone being required to Stay at Home.

Ohio has taken an aggressive approach to the Pandemic, with people helping out others in need. There are the medical personnel, first responders, grocery store team members, bus drivers, and other essential workers who are risking their lives on a daily basis to do their jobs. Thank you.

Through all that, WCRS FM is still on the air, and is not going anywhere. Our show producers are just doing their shows from home, to weather this storm.
We are all in this together.

#InThisTogetherOhio
#HunkerDownAndStayHome

Equity, Prosperity Among Highlights In Ginther's State of The City

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Equity and Prosperity were the highlights of Columbus Mayor Andrew J. Ginther’s State of the City Address on Thursday night at historic West High School in the Westgate neighborhood in the Hilltop, which was prominently featured in Ginther’s address.

The theme of Ginther’s Address was about equity. As soon as Ginther said, “Equity is the corner stone of my administration,” a protester disrupted the speech by demanding action. Ginther said, “I see you and I hear you, and I look forward to meeting with you, to hear your voices” to quell the protests from further disrupting Ginther’s address in a packed school auditorium.

After the protesters were escorted out of the Auditorium by Columbus Police Officers, Ginther continued his speech by saying, “Dissent is the highest form of patriotism”.

In his speech, Ginther talked about equality, from combatting the housing crisis and the opioid crisis, to combatting the racial barriers in our community, such as improving the city’s toxic police/community relations. “It’s time for us to discuss the long-term effects going forward, and to explore Racism as a public health crisis,” Ginther said about the racial inequality in Columbus.

Neighborhoods have been the core of the Ginther Administration from the beginning. Ginther announced big plans for Linden, that are part of the One Linden Plan. Construction is in progress for a new Fire Station 16 on Oakland Park Avenue in North Linden. Homeport will be working on a “Downtown Linden” project at the corner of Cleveland and Myrtle Avenues. $ 20 Million will be invested in an overhaul of the Hudson Street Thoroughfare as part of the One Linden Plan.

Donate to WCRS FM on Giving Tuesday

Giving Tuesday. Just, what is it anyway? Why give?

Giving Tuesday (which this year is November 27) is the online day of giving this holiday season, where you can donate online to your favorite charity. If you love WCRS-FM and the programs that air on this station, please consider a donation to your favorite community station. WCRS-FM is a low-power FM radio station that is entirely operated by hard-working volunteers. We depend upon your tax-deductible donations to stay on the air and make needed improvements to our operations. Your gift will help WCRS stay on the air and help grow its future.

To donate online to WCRS-FM, go to http://www.wcrsfm.org/donate.

The Bryan Awards Return To WCRS

The Bryan Awards were aired on WCRS over the weekend.

To view a list of the winners, click here.

The 2019 Bryan Award nominations will be announced in July, featuring "The Best of the Decade" Special Categories. The 2020 Ceremony will feature "The Best of the Last Ten Years", with Special Categories honoring the 11th through 20th Bryan Awards.

WCRS To Air Election Night Coverage on November 6

On Tuesday November 6, starting at 7PM EST/4PM PST, WCRS FM will air live coverage from Pacifica Radio of the 2018 Midterm Election Results. WCRS will break in with updates from local races throughout the evening. All regularly scheduled programming for Tuesday evening will be pre-empted to bring you coverage of this important Midterm Election.

The DJBC Happy Hour Big Table To Take Place on August 29.

The Big Table is coming to The DJBC Happy Hour, well sort of. The DJBC Happy Hour is hosting TWO Big Tables on August 29.

The first Table is August 29 at 2:30PM Davis Hall of The Columbus Foundation, at 1234 East Broad Street. To sign up for this table, go to https://columbusfoundation.org. From there, click on "The Big Table", and then "Sign Up To Participate In Public Conversation".

The second Table is August 29 at 4:30PM at WCRS FM, located at the rear carriage house at 1021 East Broad Street. Weather permitting, this table will be held outside, and limited to a maximum of 12 people. For more information, go to http://www.facebook.com/thedjbch2o, and click under "Events".

The conversations for both will center around community, but is open for an open dialogue.

The Big Table is a project of the Columbus Foundation, which the purpose of the event is for a group of 8-12 people to have an hour long conversation.

For more information on the Big Table, or to host or sign up for a Big Table conversation, go to https://columbusfoundation.org/donors/types-of-funds/special-initiatives.... There are several Big Table events community-wide on August 29, from designated sponsor locations, to businesses, private homes, churches, park benches, and community radio stations.

State of the City Celebrates The Legacy of Columbus’s Longest-Running Mayor

“The State of Our City is strong.” Those were the words that Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman said in the State of the City Celebration when asked about the state of Columbus in 2015.

From the format of the State of the City, it hardly seemed like the normal address. It felt more like a celebration of the achievements and accomplishments of an administration, and the work that needs to continue to keep Columbus shining in the spotlight long after Mayor Coleman’s run as Mayor wraps up at the end of this year.

“I think we’re in a renaissance,” Mayor Michael B. Coleman (Democrat) said in the interview-style State of the City Celebration at the Palace Theatre on Thursday in Downtown Columbus. Coleman cited the creation of 40,000 new jobs to the city, and the $ 7 Billion invested into the city.

The program, which started 26 minutes late, began with a moment of silence in remembrance of former Columbus Mayor Dana G. “Buck” Rinehart (Republican), who died on Wednesday, just days shy of his 69th birthday. Rinehart was Mayor of Columbus from 1984 to 1991, and like Coleman, helped develop the city’s growth with City Center Mall, the Short North Arts District, and a development that would later be Easton.

Following the National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance, The Harmony Project singing the Phil Collins song “Take Me Home”, with a video playing on the screens overhead of neighborhoods throughout the city, to set the tone for what was ahead during the program.

Columbus is the hometown that has gone from “Cow Town” to competing with the likes of Philadelphia and Brooklyn for the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Columbus is the top city for Young Professionals.

Columbus was the top-ranked “Opportunity City” in Forbes Magazine. Columbus was ranked the top city for African-Americans in Ebony Magazine. Columbus received a score of 100 in the Human Rights Campaign Index. Columbus, in the 15 years that Coleman has been Mayor, has grown and made strides.

Everything Is Coming Up Job Growth For 2015 In Gahanna

“The overall news is pretty good.” That was the message that Dr. Bill LaFayette preached at the Creekside Conference and Event Center as the 18th Annual Groundhog Day Economic Forecast Breakfast took place on January 30 in Gahanna.

LaFayette, who is the founder and CEO of Regionomics, an economic consulting firm based out of Columbus, gave the Keynote Presentation to an audience of approximately 200 attendees.

LaFayette gave a presentation, which was very positive and encouraging for the most part on job growth and economic development.

“I’ve been giving these speeches for 15 years now,” LaFayette said. “They’re fun now. For the first time, I don’t have to tell you to ‘brace for impact’. Things are good, both locally, and nationally.”

According to LaFayette’s 2015 Regionomics Columbus Forecast, the unemployment rate in the Columbus Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which covers ten counties, is four percent even, compared to that of Ohio (4.8 percent) or the United States as a whole (5.4 percent). “Hiring has reached a pre-recession peak,” LaFayette added. In contrast, LaFayette added that the unemployment rate numbers only count the people who are actually actively looking for work, as the labor force itself continues to decline.

“The labor force started to fall in the Recession, and has continued falling ever since. The share of people in the labor force is the lowest since the late 1970s,” LaFayette said. “The four percent unemployment rate is real.”

Despite the labor force drop, employment is projected to surpass one million in 2015. 80,600 jobs were added to the Central Ohio region from January 2010 to June 2014, according to the numbers LaFayette presented, with a 9.2 percent increase in jobs.

In regards to the economy for Gahanna, LaFayette said, “The economy in the 43230 zip code (which serves most of Gahanna) is widely diversified, more diversified than in many zip codes in Central Ohio”.

State of the City Address 2014 – Coleman Wants All Columbus Residents To Share In The City’s Success

Bryan Curtiss, Writer

Sharing success was the theme of this year’s State of the City Address in Columbus. However, three barriers – homelessness, unemployment, and education, were the focal points of Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman’s 15th Annual State of the City Address on Wednesday night.

In what was a reality check for most people in attendance at the Battelle Grand Ballroom of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, the city’s homeless was one of the big topics of the State of the City Address, and Coleman made it a goal to "rebuild the lives of the homeless."

"Columbus is a community of stark and sobering contrasts. Some bask in the glow of our success while others struggle every day just to see the light," Coleman remarked about the homeless population in the city. Columbus has a high poverty rate, with some neighborhoods having over 30 percent unemployment rates. The Median Household Income for Columbus residents is $ 8,000 below National Average.

Coleman then told the struggles of two homeless people living in the Faith Mission Shelter while striving for a better life for themselves. One was of a technical worker who ended up homeless due to loss of income, and another was of a dislocated worker, who chose to stay in Columbus, rather than relocate to another city.

“Sharing our success means ensuring our residents have roofs over their heads and strong neighborhoods to live in,” Coleman said.

"Homelessness is becoming a bigger problem in this city than in this city's history," Coleman added. This winter alone, there have been an estimated 1,200 homeless residents in the city, with approximately 150 of them being turned away from overcrowded shelters, left to "fend for themselves".

Coleman proposed that $ 1.1 Million will be used to combat homelessness, partnering with the Community Shelter Board on the nation’s first case management system of customized intensive individual care.

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