The New Year Recycles Old Trends


26:44 minutes (36.72 MB)

On this show Lena talks with a local student about his school project to bring awareness to the silent epidemic: child abuse. Trend Watch covers New Year resolutions, and Listen to This focuses on a new and upcoming Hip Hop artist. Tune in to hear how youth are making a difference!

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56:35 minutes (51.81 MB)

Simply Living Calendar - January 11 - 17 2010


3:03 minutes (5.59 MB)

Larry Kensington - Nightmix 01-08-10 Part One


58:48 minutes (53.83 MB)

Fiddler Jay Ungar and guitarist Molly Mason are not just husband and wife--they're the undisputed first couple of American roots music. In the first hour of this week's program, they play a couple of their trademark waltzes as well as a couple of swing tunes from the 1930s. You'll also hear two outstanding Canadian groups that give fresh perspective to older music--the Susie Arioli Band from Montreal and the Nova Scotian group Great Big Sea.

Larry Kensington - Nightmix 01-08-10 Part Two


58:33 minutes (53.6 MB)

For close to 40 years, Vangelis has been one of the most consistently original voices in ambient and new age music. Tonight's second hour features some of his best from the 1970s and 1990s.

Pamoja FM December 30th 2009


57:33 minutes (65.87 MB)

ft.Burundian Kidum w/ Urugendo

Youth Beat Goes North to Alaska!


27:05 minutes (37.2 MB)

"Green Chucks" interviews Kyle Amore about his experiences as a camp counselor for Camp Fire USA's Rural Alaska. This program is unique because the camp counselors go to the kids; more specifically the camp counselors are flown to each native village where they conduct the camp. The program focuses on water safety and cold-water survival instruction. They provide swimming lessons and day camp activities to children and teens living in native communities. Kyle talks about the differences in cultures and life perspectives of native Alaskans and Americans. He also talked about his own culture shock and what he has gained from the experience.
 

Simply Living Calendar - January 4-10 2010


1:31 minutes (2.79 MB)

Mountain Top Removal Documentary and Protest Rally Coverage with Host Evan Davis


58:30 minutes (107.11 MB)

Welcome to Conscious Voices, a weekly program that seeks to promote both thought and activism on a variety of issues affecting the community and our collective future. I'm evan Davis, your host for this edition.

Plans for 2010 from one WCRS reporter--Tom Over

So as to manage my time and energy in 2010, I think I would be wise to focus on three main projects. Please let me know what you think. My guess is that these things will be better if we put our minds together.
 

(I)   Serial previews for the US Social Forum and in-person reporting on the event, and the people and issues involved;

(II)  Serial previews and reporting on the WCRS community forums, along with some reporting based on following what participants in the forums communicate about what issues matter to them;

and (III) Serial reporting on the problems of Ohio's factory farming and what can be done about it. I intend to frame this reporting within the context of Peak Oil, Climate Change, over-population and other broad issues.

I dislike how a lot of environmental reporting homes in on a specific environmental problem such as mountain top removal mining, without framing the issue within a broader ecological and socio-political context. 

Obviously this also happens with reporting that doesn't present itself as having an environmentalist perspective. For example, WOSU, Columbus Alive, the Other Paper, or 614 Magazine have reported on bicycle commuting and local food.

But, to my knowledge, they have done so without much, if any, mention of Peak Oil, Climate Change, or even concerns about air or water quality for that matter. 

So, I intend to use Peak Oil, Climate Change, and other broad ecological and political issues as a reference point in every peice of reporting I create.

Localism isn't about focusing on,  for example, the buses, bike lanes, farmers' markets, co-ops, and community gardens of Columbus as if no world beyond our city existed. Rather, as far as I am concerned, localism is about finding local ways to actually do something about the various global problems we become aware of.

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