Blogs

The DJBC Happy Hour Big Table To Take Place on August 29.

The Big Table is coming to The DJBC Happy Hour, well sort of. The DJBC Happy Hour is hosting TWO Big Tables on August 29.

The first Table is August 29 at 2:30PM Davis Hall of The Columbus Foundation, at 1234 East Broad Street. To sign up for this table, go to https://columbusfoundation.org. From there, click on "The Big Table", and then "Sign Up To Participate In Public Conversation".

The second Table is August 29 at 4:30PM at WCRS FM, located at the rear carriage house at 1021 East Broad Street. Weather permitting, this table will be held outside, and limited to a maximum of 12 people. For more information, go to http://www.facebook.com/thedjbch2o, and click under "Events".

The conversations for both will center around community, but is open for an open dialogue.

The Big Table is a project of the Columbus Foundation, which the purpose of the event is for a group of 8-12 people to have an hour long conversation.

For more information on the Big Table, or to host or sign up for a Big Table conversation, go to https://columbusfoundation.org/donors/types-of-funds/special-initiatives.... There are several Big Table events community-wide on August 29, from designated sponsor locations, to businesses, private homes, churches, park benches, and community radio stations.

98.3 back on the air

Hello WCRS listeners, just a quick update.

Our chief engineer Eugene Beer was able to install a replacement receive transmitter so we could get 98.3 back on the air. So enjoy tuning in to both of our frequencies again.

98.3 temporarily off the air

Due to an interference problem with receiving 92.7 at the translator site 98.3 is currently not broadcasting WCRS-LP. Our volunteer engineer has been hard at work getting WGRN back on the air and will be working on this task as soon as he can. We are still broadcasting 24-7 on 92.7 and streaming on-line and hope to get 98.3 back up as soon as possible. If you miss WCRS-LP feel free to donate to our station so we can afford better equipment to keep the station going.

Stay tuned for more info - the all volunteer station management

Reggae Radio Takeover Fundraiser - July 7th - Noon to 8pm

WCRS is hosting a live afternoon of reggae music with live DJs interviews, food and drinks (beer sales to benefit the station) and a charity auction. It is an excellent opportunity to meet people from the local reggae scene, tour the WCRS studios and kick back and enjoy the weekend following the 4th of July.

Admission is free, so come down July 7th (or 8th if it rains) and support community radio. The studio is located behind 1021 E. Broad St and the parking lot behind the station is free to use on evenings and weekends. If you can't make it in person you can tune in to the event via radio at 92.7 & 98.3 or on-line via WCRSfm.org

Visit WCRS @ Comfest

Hello WCRS listeners, you can come by and visit our booth at Comfest this year.

Our booth is located on the road way that runs through the park to the shelter house. We are on the left (if you are walking south) before the statue of Gooddale if you enter from park near the Gazebo stage.

It's the best way to meet your favorite show hosts and to find out more about the station and how you can get involved.

We have silk screened t-shirts we made ourselves featuring our new logo for sale.

The stickers we ordered might be lost in transit, time will tell.

New Show Witches Brew premiering this Thursday @ 8pm

Hello WCRS Listeners,
We are in the process of revamping this website. But in the meantime a new show has been added to the WCRS schedule.
Witches Brew will feature woman musicians and highlight local musical events with female musicians.

We are really excited to share this show on the airwaves with you.

Tune in this Thursday at 8pm.

All Disquieted on the Western Front

Every year that I am able I pay a visit to Big Sur, California, one of my favorite places since I was very small. I love the scenic drive up the rugged coast on the winding WPA-era highway One through the land where the mountains meet the sea. You've seen it in car commercials, and the famous chase scene from North by Northwest, and the picture in your mind, no doubt, is of the azure Pacific waters glistening in the sun as waves lap the rocky coast line below sloping Emerald meadows. As a kid I took all of this for granted, but I gradually came to realize that the ribbon of highway isn't the only feature there that is foreign to the natural landscape. The fact is that those brilliant swaths of Green shouldn't be there – and they wouldn't be were it not for the small herds of cows that regularly scour the fenced-in private ranches, allowing grasses to flourish where once there were coastal prairies and thickets of woods. The fact is that the Big Sur we have all seen in pictures and post cards for as long as we can remember is, in reality, a severely altered landscape, some of whose most iconic features are the result of large scale human-caused damage. In that sense, Big Sur, as we know it, is a perfect metaphor for the much larger environmental crisis facing the American prairies of the South and MidWest , and the way we have grown to accept the destructive agricultural practice known as “ranching” as an immutable facet of the American identity.

State of the City Celebrates The Legacy of Columbus’s Longest-Running Mayor

“The State of Our City is strong.” Those were the words that Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman said in the State of the City Celebration when asked about the state of Columbus in 2015.

From the format of the State of the City, it hardly seemed like the normal address. It felt more like a celebration of the achievements and accomplishments of an administration, and the work that needs to continue to keep Columbus shining in the spotlight long after Mayor Coleman’s run as Mayor wraps up at the end of this year.

“I think we’re in a renaissance,” Mayor Michael B. Coleman (Democrat) said in the interview-style State of the City Celebration at the Palace Theatre on Thursday in Downtown Columbus. Coleman cited the creation of 40,000 new jobs to the city, and the $ 7 Billion invested into the city.

The program, which started 26 minutes late, began with a moment of silence in remembrance of former Columbus Mayor Dana G. “Buck” Rinehart (Republican), who died on Wednesday, just days shy of his 69th birthday. Rinehart was Mayor of Columbus from 1984 to 1991, and like Coleman, helped develop the city’s growth with City Center Mall, the Short North Arts District, and a development that would later be Easton.

Following the National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance, The Harmony Project singing the Phil Collins song “Take Me Home”, with a video playing on the screens overhead of neighborhoods throughout the city, to set the tone for what was ahead during the program.

Columbus is the hometown that has gone from “Cow Town” to competing with the likes of Philadelphia and Brooklyn for the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Columbus is the top city for Young Professionals.

Columbus was the top-ranked “Opportunity City” in Forbes Magazine. Columbus was ranked the top city for African-Americans in Ebony Magazine. Columbus received a score of 100 in the Human Rights Campaign Index. Columbus, in the 15 years that Coleman has been Mayor, has grown and made strides.

Everything Is Coming Up Job Growth For 2015 In Gahanna

“The overall news is pretty good.” That was the message that Dr. Bill LaFayette preached at the Creekside Conference and Event Center as the 18th Annual Groundhog Day Economic Forecast Breakfast took place on January 30 in Gahanna.

LaFayette, who is the founder and CEO of Regionomics, an economic consulting firm based out of Columbus, gave the Keynote Presentation to an audience of approximately 200 attendees.

LaFayette gave a presentation, which was very positive and encouraging for the most part on job growth and economic development.

“I’ve been giving these speeches for 15 years now,” LaFayette said. “They’re fun now. For the first time, I don’t have to tell you to ‘brace for impact’. Things are good, both locally, and nationally.”

According to LaFayette’s 2015 Regionomics Columbus Forecast, the unemployment rate in the Columbus Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which covers ten counties, is four percent even, compared to that of Ohio (4.8 percent) or the United States as a whole (5.4 percent). “Hiring has reached a pre-recession peak,” LaFayette added. In contrast, LaFayette added that the unemployment rate numbers only count the people who are actually actively looking for work, as the labor force itself continues to decline.

“The labor force started to fall in the Recession, and has continued falling ever since. The share of people in the labor force is the lowest since the late 1970s,” LaFayette said. “The four percent unemployment rate is real.”

Despite the labor force drop, employment is projected to surpass one million in 2015. 80,600 jobs were added to the Central Ohio region from January 2010 to June 2014, according to the numbers LaFayette presented, with a 9.2 percent increase in jobs.

In regards to the economy for Gahanna, LaFayette said, “The economy in the 43230 zip code (which serves most of Gahanna) is widely diversified, more diversified than in many zip codes in Central Ohio”.

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